Written September 18, 2014     
 

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© 2014 Bob Lonsberry

 
 
I KNOW WHAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LOOKS LIKE

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I know what domestic violence looks like.

Hell, I know what it tastes like. It’s the salty taste of blood after you get popped in the mouth. The odd aroma of iron as it dries on your lips.

The swirling dizziness when you bounce off a wall or take a swat to the head.

The breathless, convulsing, burning sting as you dance across the room or writhe on the floor while the belt lashes you.

The belt or the Hot Wheels track or the wooden spoon.

Or the switch or the leather strop.

It is the thundering curses downstairs at night when they come home from the bar, the throwing of furniture and the heavy thud of bodies against the wall or the floor.

It is the crack of a gunshot and the flash of emergency lights against your bedroom wall.

It’s running, at age 13, to get a filet knife from your tackle box so that you can go out to the yard, where he is throttling her on the grass, and sob that if he doesn’t get off your mommy you’re going to kill him.

And three years later he’s on her again and for the first time you throw him to the ground and it’s the last time you sleep in your childhood home.

I know what domestic violence looks like.

And I can still feel it with the tip of my tongue, where a tooth chipped more than 40 years ago when I got cuffed into the porcelain sink board.

I know what domestic violence looks like.

And I hate it.

But I don’t understand what’s happening now.

In an odd, coordinated attack, progressive politicians and activists are dog piling on the NFL. They have decided to ruthlessly attack America’s favorite sport.

It seems part shakedown and part politics – a way to extort protection money from the league, and to galvanize Democratic female voters in the run up to an important midterm election.

It’s being done in the name of fighting domestic violence, but it is a very selective fight.

For example, angry activists have insisted that football players accused of domestic violence be suspended by their teams and the league. Those same activists have said that the league needs to have a stronger policy against domestic violence. They have also called for the firing of the NFL commissioner.

Yet they have been completely silent about women’s professional soccer.

Hope Solo, a prominent women’s professional soccer player, is awaiting trial now on domestic violence charges.

Yet she is not suspended.

She has not been criticized.

Her league is not under attack.

And nobody has said that her commissioner should go.

Which makes no sense.

A domestic violence arrest is a domestic violence arrest. And unless there are different rules for white women – like Hope Solo – than for black men – like the accused football players – then the double standard makes no sense.

Neither, really, does the attack on the NFL.

When grouped by demographic cohort – namely age and race – and compared with individuals from similar demographic cohorts who don’t play football, repeated studies have shown that NFL players are more law abiding than their non-football-playing peers.

Another oddity is the determination that the NFL must be the domestic violence battleground. The league comprises an infinitesimally small fraction of the American population, and yet strictures being urged upon the league are not being proposed for the society as a whole.

For example, if a football player is charged with domestic violence and loses his career, why doesn’t an architect? Or a lawyer or an electrician or a waitress?

And if members of Congress are going to demand this standard for the NFL, how about for themselves?

It makes no sense.

For some reason, the progressive Left is scapegoating professional football.

I think it’s for money – notice that all the activists are now saying the league must invest in changing the culture. That means give the activists money. Create a controversy, and solicit donations to make the controversy go away. It is a scheme perfected by Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton.

I also think it’s meant to fire up women voters, something Democrats do every two years in the weeks before an election.

I also think it’s hypocrisy.

For example, when a beer company threatens to pull its sponsorship money from the NFL over domestic violence, it’s hard not to laugh. The truth is, beer consumption correlates with domestic violence far more than football does, and many terrible acts of domestic violence have been committed by people who have beer on their breath.

The fact is, at its root, this isn’t about domestic violence. It’s about a financial and political agenda. It is a feeding frenzy of group condemnation.

While out in the real world, domestic violence is all around us. And it doesn’t always fit the stereotype the current focus seeks to reinforce. Women are horribly victimized by domestic violence, but so are men. In fact, repeated studies show that women are more likely to commit acts of domestic violence against men than men are against women.

This isn’t a woman’s issue. It is a morals and values issue. It is a human issue. It doesn’t matter what’s in your pants, it matters what’s in your heart.

And evil people who would do violence in the home must be warned and denounced. We must all recoil against domestic violence.

But we must not exploit it to advance a financial or political agenda.

I don’t know what the progressives have against football and the NFL. But they shouldn’t pervert an ongoing national tragedy to benefit themselves.

Fighting domestic violence isn’t about fighting the NFL, it’s about calling people to be better, and protecting their victims when they don’t.

I know what domestic violence looks like.

But I don’t recognize this side show.


- by Bob Lonsberry © 2014

   
        
   
 
    

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Sep 11 NOW IT'S TIME TO BE PISSED 64
Sep 6 DARYL PIERSON DIED ON A BEAUTIFUL DAY 84
Sep 4 TOO BAD WE DON'T HAVE A PRESIDENT 87
Sep 3 A NOTE TO TEACHERS 27
Sep 2 DEMS ARE WRONG TO BLOCK KATHY HOCHUL 27
Aug 20 COPS WILL DIE BECAUSE OF FERGUSON 101
Aug 15 WHAT IS THE REAL DANGER TO BLACK PEOPLE? 48
Aug 12 THE DEATH OF A COMIC GENIUS 95
Aug 11 SATURDAY NIGHT IN CANANDAIGUA 66
Aug 7 'A VARIATION OF THE HUMAN SPECIES' 61
Aug 5 LAWSUIT AGAINST PRESIDENT IS A GOOD IDEA 48
Aug 4 GUN-TOTING TEACHER SHOULDN'T BE DESTROYED 56
Jul 21 WHERE I GOT MY RED WHISKERS 61
Jul 14 RIOTS OF 1964 ARE NOTHING TO CELEBRATE 49
Jul 9 A LETTER TO MITT ROMNEY 80
Jul 1 ON THE LOSS OF A FRIENDLY VOICE 96
Jun 30 'SO MUCH TO BE PROUD OF IN THIS DISTRICT' 43
Jun 26 SEND THEM HOME -- THEIRS, NOT OURS 76
Jun 23 KINDERGARTEN IS TOO LATE 65
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